Helping With Middle East Crisis

Syria

Since its beginnings in March 2011, the Syrian conflict has claimed the lives of thousands of innocent civilians and of militants. More than 3 million people have been displaced, of whom 1.1 million people by March 2013 have become refugees in neighboring countries, and more than 2 million people have been internally displaced. As the situation has deteriorated month after month, the focus has shifted towards saving people’s lives by providing them with food, health, and shelter. -To learn more click here.

Jordan

Certainly the largest problem in Jordan at the moment has to do with the migration of Syrian Refugees into the country.
 With the ongoing Syrian Crisis, the flow of refugees into Jordan continues to increase exponentially. The Government of Jordan estimates there are now over 600.000 Syrians in the country of which over half are children. Other sources are estimating that the total number of Syrians who entered Jordan since the beginning of 2012 exceeds one million. To learn more about this crisis, and what you can do to help, click here. 

Lebanon

The Syrian crisis worsens, and more refugees flow into Lebanon. As of March 9, 2013 the Lebanese government estimates there are over 1,000,000 Syrian refugees in Lebanon. The need to help these families is increasing exponentially. Middle East Fellowship recognizes the excellent work of “The Heart for Lebanon”, and local and international partners working together all over Lebanon to meet the various needs of these families who have fled their country with minimal belongings. Because of their excellent work MEF has chosen to collect funds and pass them on to this worthwhile ministry.

How You Can Help Current Situation In Syria?

Since its beginnings in March 2011, the Syrian conflict has claimed the lives of thousands of innocent civilians and of militants. More than 3 million people have been displaced, of whom 1.1 million people by March 2013 have become refugees in neighboring countries, and more than 2 million people have been internally displaced. As the situation has deteriorated month after month, the focus has shifted towards saving people’s lives by providing them with food, health, and shelter. In an area called the Christian valley is s village called Yazdeia, a small village of 2500. Like many villages with all of the fighting there has been a flood of displaced families from fighting areas such as Homs, Aleppo, Damascus and Ham. In partnership with the Presbyterian church of Yazedia, Middle East Fellowship is collecting funds to help these displaced Syrians

The Presbyterian church of Yazedia established a committee for social and medical assistance and has recently set its focus on emergency services for displaced children with many families. There are currently 300 displaced families in and around the village of Yazedia. Funding through this local church provides food and non-food relief items such as cash assistance to help families pay rent, provide medicine for the sick and war wounded, as well as helping war orphans. Current relief focuses are on providing school kits for displaced children so they may resume education in the interim and oil for heating as winter approaches.

Standing With Christians In Iraq

On June 10 the extremist group ISIS entered Mosul, the second largest city in Iraq. Mosul and the surrounding Nineveh Province has been home to the largest concentration of Christians in Iraq, some of the churches and monasteries there even dating back to the fourth century. In the following weeks the homes and businesses of Christians were marked with the Arabic letter “n” for “Nazarene. Then on July 19 ISIS made the devastating pronouncement that Christians must convert to Islam, pay a heavy tax (which for almost everyone would be impossible), or be killed.

Thousands of Christians have had to abandon everything—businesses, homes, and possessions—and flee to the cities of Irbil and Kirkuk in Kurdistan. Irbil was soon overrun with refugees, and many have headed south to Kirkuk. The Kirkuk Presbyterian Church has received at least 12 families, who are living on the property. They are also helping an additional 50 families who are staying with other churches in the area with food, bedding, blankets and some pocket money. The situation is very desperate. More refugees are coming down to Kirkuk from Irbil every day. Anything we can do to help the churches in the area meet the growing needs would be a great blessing. Your financial contribution will help ensure that some of these refugees will have food to eat and basic medical supplies and other necessities during these difficult days.